Traffic Offenses

If you or someone close to you has been arrested or received a citation for a traffic offense it is important to consult with an experienced attorney immediately.  Sometimes police issue what appears to be a traffic ticket. However, they actually charge you with a traffic criminal offense which is a misdemeanor. A Traffic Offense conviction can have an adverse effect on your driving privilege and even your freedom. Do not be so quick to pay what you think are traffic tickets. It is important to have an experienced attorney review your case.  Police are quick to write up their reports. They often do not gather or turn over enough evidence. It is possible that the prosecutor does not have enough evidence to prove the charge against you beyond a reasonable doubt.

Typically Traffic Criminal Offenses include:

  • Expired DL more 6 months

  • Expired Registration more 6 month

  • Operating a vehicle w/out a valid DL 

  • Driving with a suspended license (DWLS)

  • Restriction Violation (business restriction)

  • Reckless driving

  • Improper Tag Attached

  • Racing on Highway

Don’t plead your case out before consulting an attorney. Certain Traffic Violations can lead to a one-year, two-year, or five-year driver’s license suspension. It is critical to make sure your rights are protected. 

As a prosecutor, Steven J. Litvack handled thousands of traffic criminal offenses. He knows what is required to support a conviction and what to look for when trying to get your case REDUCED or DISMISSED. Your driving privilege is extremely important. Do not put your driving privilege in jeopardy.

Were You Legally Stopped?

The law specifically outlines what the police must observe before they can pull you over. Sometimes people are pulled over before their actions actually amount to a traffic infraction. Depending on the individual facts of your case, the police may not have been legally allowed to stop you. If so, the initial stop can be challenged which could result in a DISMISSAL of your charge.

Can they prove it?

The law only requires a police officer have Probable Cause to arrest someone. But, the State of Florida must prove the charge beyond a reasonable doubt in order to support a conviction. Although the police may have had enough evidence to issue you a citation, the prosecution may not have enough evidence to convict you. It is important to consult with an experienced attorney before pleading to a crime.